Author Archives: Kaspa

Why I love “Finding Your Way Home”

pastKaspa writes: A few years ago Satya and I sat down to create an e-course that encapsulated the spirit of writing our way home. Of course that’s true for all of our courses, but this was the first course that we wrote together and we wanted to make something special.

Satya wrote four stories to go alongside the course. In them Joshua slips into the lives of the un-seeing and helps wake them up. He sees small stones all around him and encourages others to do the same. He changes the lives of the people he meets, and although these are fictional characters in a story, we have seen the mindful writing practices we champion making a difference to real people’s lives.

We recorded four videos to go alongside the course too. Watching them now is like looking back into the past. Since then Satya has become ordained, received a new name, and published another novel, I have started a private psychotherapy practice and my hair has grown!

What pleases me when I watch them again is that the ideas we are talking about still hold up. We talk about our relationships with special places and with people and about coming into a new relationship with ourselves. I find myself nodding along and saying, “Yes, that’s right!”

I love this course. It guides you through exploring your whole world using mindful writing, leading to new ways of seeing and to a deeper acceptance of yourself.  It shows us what’s important, what we’ve got left to work on in our lives, and helps us hold what we’ve got left to work on with compassion.

We called the course Finding Your Way Home because it helps you find your home wherever you are, through exploring your place in the world right now.

Sign up now for Finding Your Way Home (Starting Thursday) or for the e-course Satya is running, the wonderful Writing and Spiritual Practice.

 

Image: Attribution Some rights reserved by Ian Sane

Day 28: January Mindful Writing Challenge

italySmooth, rounded edges of cobblestone, lime washed walls tinted red ochre. Sun-baked bricks. This sunny, chilly morning, Cefalu village in winter. On Via Duomo old women open up their shutters.

*

Ilona Martonfi

We’re on the twenty-eighth day of the January Mindful Writing Challenge - please post your small stone in the comments below.

If you’re not already signed up, our 31 Days of Waking Up daily email package was designed to accompany you during this (or any) month of mindful writing. Keep writing!

 

image:  Some rights reserved by christine zenino

Day 27: January Mindful Writing Challenge

sparrowPuffed up against the cold
But still cheerful
Hopping and chirping
In the cold and the dark
Learning from sparrows

*

Nina Mallozzi

We’re on the twenty-seventh day of the January Mindful Writing Challenge - please post your small stone in the comments below.

If you’re not already signed up, our 31 Days of Waking Up daily email package was designed to accompany you during this (or any) month of mindful writing. Keep writing!

 

image: Some rights reserved by barryskeates

Day 26: January Mindful Writing Challenge

rugpray mat flapping
my dusty mind
downswing

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Ken Sawitri

We’re on the twenty-sixth day of the January Mindful Writing Challenge - please post your small stone in the comments below.

If you’re not already signed up, our 31 Days of Waking Up daily email package was designed to accompany you during this (or any) month of mindful writing. Keep writing!

 

image:  Some rights reserved by cordelia_persen

Day 25: January Mindful Writing Challenge

rainkids at the bus stop -
the phenomenology /
of mobile call plans
rain last night again /
the valley saturated /
the same old mistakes

*

Pip Williams

We’re on the twenty-fifth day of the January Mindful Writing Challenge - please post your small stone in the comments below.

If you’re not already signed up, our 31 Days of Waking Up daily email package was designed to accompany you during this (or any) month of mindful writing. Keep writing!

 

image:  Some rights reserved by Skley

Day 24: January Mindful Writing Challenge

snowfresh snowfall –
shadows of bare branches
crisscross erased paths

*

Theresa A. Cancro

 

We’re on the fifteenth day of the January Mindful Writing Challenge - please post your small stone in the comments below.

If you’re not already signed up, our 31 Days of Waking Up daily email package was designed to accompany you during this (or any) month of mindful writing. Keep writing!

 

image: Attribution Some rights reserved by Colynn

Day 23: January Mindful Writing Challenge

stormknock out punch
trees fall
in a winter storm

*

Nancy May

We’re on the twenty-third day of the January Mindful Writing Challenge - please post your small stone in the comments below.

If you’re not already signed up, our 31 Days of Waking Up daily email package was designed to accompany you during this (or any) month of mindful writing. Keep writing!

 

image: Attribution Some rights reserved by blahidontreallycare

Day 22: January Mindful Writing Challenge

treenothing left to say…
the oak’s
bare branches

*

Ben Moeller-Gaa

We’re on the twenty-second day of the January Mindful Writing Challenge - please post your small stone in the comments below.

If you’re not already signed up, our 31 Days of Waking Up daily email package was designed to accompany you during this (or any) month of mindful writing. Keep writing!

 

iamge: Attribution Some rights reserved by muffinn

Day 21: January Mindful Writing Challenge

Salty ice-creamedbeach
caramel skin;

a sliver of honey
mingled with sea-sweat

where I peel scorched burls
from your back.

*

Ian Mullins

We’re on the twenty-first day of the January Mindful Writing Challenge - please post your small stone in the comments below.

If you’re not already signed up, our 31 Days of Waking Up daily email package was designed to accompany you during this (or any) month of mindful writing. Keep writing!

 

Image: AttributionNo Derivative Works Some rights reserved by papalars

How to feel at home wherever you are

wheeliebin

Kaspa writes: First, some course news  In February we’re running two e-courses. I’m facilitating Finding Your Way Home, and Satya is leading Writing as Spiritual Practice.

This month we’re also introducing an additional premium course package, which includes two one-to-one Creative Boosts as well as the usual course material.

How we can feel at home wherever we are

There is a spiritual ideal which says that one should feel at home wherever one is. Or perhaps that one can feel at home wherever one is.

I know that in reality there are some places in which it is easier for me to settle and feel at home, and some places where it’s much more difficult.

Why is that, and what makes the difference? How can I feel at home wherever I am?

Turning into our street, after a long-drive home and a few days away, I feel myself start to relax. The dull artichoke-green wheelie-bins are lined up near the roadside. They have black waste-to-landfill bags stacked on top of them. When the wheelie-bins first arrived I watched that stacking habit spread up the street like a minor infection.

The orange-sulphur street lamps cast an unnatural glow on the scene.  A silver Bengal cat crouches behind the wheel-arch of a plumber’s van.  I must have seen this whole picture hundreds of times. More perhaps.

In reality, I know very little about the lives of those black-bin-bag stackers, or the plumber, or the family which owns five Bengal cats, however their presence is consistent. I have no idea what is changing behind most of the closed doors of this street, but the illusion of things remaining the same is a comfort.

And there is the clue as to what makes it easier for me to feel at home.

Part of me feels like there is a kind of safety in knowing how things are, in the predictability of the lined up bins and the presence of the neighbours skulking cat.

Another part of me knows that this feeling of safety rests on an illusion. There may be more or less predictable events, but nothing is certain.

I think it’s this uncertainty we are running from, when we run towards home. Or rather, it’s the reaction we have to this uncertainty, and the feelings it gives rise to, which creates an urgent impulse to find certainty in us.

How can we feel at home wherever we are?

Here are three ways.

Worldly security

Build a home for yourself where the chances for uncertainty are less, and where you can manage change and unexpected events as they occur.  Make sure you can pay your mortgage each month, and that you have the right kind of insurance.

Good community

Find good friends to join or create a community of friendship; either locally or a network spread across the world. This web of friendship can hold you when life sends unpleasant surprises your way, and celebrate with you when life sends pleasant surprises.

Facing uncertainty and change

Worldly security is not guaranteed and even good friends can let you down. The way to a deep and lasting sense of being at home wherever you are is to face and accept the truth that everything changes.

It is easy to say ‘everything changes’, however the way to finding yourself at home is not in repeating platitudes but in really seeing and facing whatever is happening in your life right now.

We move towards being at ease with universal uncertainty through working with real examples of change.

I try and do all three of these in my own life, and it’s a work in progress on all three fronts. My income is getting more secure, my friendships are deepening and I try to work with uncertainty whenever it appears.

I still look forward to turning into our street after a long journey though.

Join us from February 6th us for one of our mindful writing e-courses Finding Your Way Home or Writing and Spiritual Practice. Find out what it means to be at home for you, whatever is happening in your life, or write your way to  praise, clear-seeing, perseverance & faith.

Photo by by mugley, some rights reserved.